IMPACT OF FEEDING PRACTICES, MATERNAL DIETARY HABITS AND MATERNAL BODY MASS INDEX ON GROWTH PATTERN IN BREAST-FED AND FORMULA-FED INFANTS

Main Article Content

Mehwish Durrani
Rubina Nazli
Sadia Fatima
Muhammad Abubakr
Muhammad Shafiq

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of feeding practices, maternal dietary habits and maternal body mass index (BMI) on growth pattern of breast-fed and formula-fed infants.
METHODS: This cross-sectional study was performed on 50 healthy infants. Twenty-five each breast-fed (BF) and formula-fed (FF) infants along with their mothers were enrolled. The infants’ weight, height, BMI, head circumference and skinfolds (biceps and triceps) were recorded. Infant’s mother weight, height, BMI, mid-arm circumference and skinfolds were also recorded. The mothers filled 24-hours dietary-recall proforma. The 24-hours dietary-recall was then analyzed by windiet® software.
RESULTS: Age of infants was 78.40±35.88 days at time of assessment. Height and weight standard deviation score (SDS) was found to be -2.759±3.10 and -0.538±2.05 with SDS of BMI was 1.59±2.30. Mean anthropometric measurements between the two groups were not significantly different except for head circumference (BF=38.12±4.46, FF=40.32±2.34; p-value=0.036). BMI and age of mothers were 26.49±4.93 kg/m2 and 29.54±2.86 years at assessment. Anthropometric analysis of mothers showed an increasing trend of different parameters especially waist circumference (cm) in breast-feeding mothers (lactating=75±15.6, non-lactating=61±18.2, p-value=0.007). Dietary intake of lactating mothers (energy=3032±12 Kcal; % energy intake=125.9±53.3) was more as compared to non-lactating mothers (1878±99 Kcal; % energy intake=78±41.2). Similarly intake of carbohydrates (lactating=414±186, non-lactating=274±175), fats (lactating=109±60.4, non-lactating=66.6±33.7), proteins (lactating=98.2±52.5, non-lactating=60.2±54.2), zinc (lactating=14.64±7.28, non-lactating=8.08±8.53), selenium (lactating=30.4±22.3, non-lactating=4.12±7.64) and dietary fiber (lactating=41.3±19.5, non-lactating=20.4±15.5) were significantly different.
CONCLUSION: Growth pattern of both breast-fed and formula-fed infants were not significantly different. Energy intake, percentage energy intake and intake of macronutrients & micronutrients are more in lactating mothers.

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How to Cite
Durrani, M., R. Nazli, S. Fatima, M. Abubakr, and M. Shafiq. “IMPACT OF FEEDING PRACTICES, MATERNAL DIETARY HABITS AND MATERNAL BODY MASS INDEX ON GROWTH PATTERN IN BREAST-FED AND FORMULA-FED INFANTS”. KHYBER MEDICAL UNIVERSITY JOURNAL, Vol. 12, no. 1, Mar. 2020, pp. 43-8, doi:10.35845/kmuj.2020.19866.
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Original Articles

References

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