CAREER MOTIVATION AMONG STUDENTS OF DIFFERENT UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL INSTITUTES: A REVIEW OF EXISTING PERCEPTIONS

Main Article Content

Bushra Shaheen
Ghazala Shaheen
Taqdees Mehmood
Saad Ahmad Khan

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To explore future career prospects among undergraduate medical students from different institutes and to review existing perceptions among them.


METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in six different medical colleges of Pakistan from January 2017 to June 2017 including two public and four private sector medical colleges. A structured and pre-validated questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data was analyzed using SPSS 21 and Epi info 7.


RESULTS: Out of 164 students, 75 (45.8%) were males and 89 (54.2%) were females. The public and private sector students distribution was 72 (43.9%) and 92 (56.10%) respectively. Mean age was 22.63±1.99 years.  Out of 143 (87.2%) students responding to do specialization, 88 (53.7%) wanted to go abroad while 55 (33.5%) were interested in local training. Upon making rural work obligatory, 111 (68%) showed willingness to work with maximum (n=57/111; 51.35%) wanted to serve the under-privileged community. Majority (n=139; 85%) of the students had no intention to change the profession and maximum (n=55; 33.54%) opted for the field of Medicine as specialization. In factors, own decision by students and gender-based impact on specialization in both sectors had a significant relationship with different motivational aspects (p-value = <0.01).


CONCLUSION: The study revealed that majority of the students wanted to do specialization and preferred going abroad for specialization than opting for local training. About two-third of students were willing to join rural setting, if made obligatory and almost all wanted to be in medical profession throughout the life.

Article Details

How to Cite
Shaheen, B., G. Shaheen, T. Mehmood, and S. Khan. “CAREER MOTIVATION AMONG STUDENTS OF DIFFERENT UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL INSTITUTES: A REVIEW OF EXISTING PERCEPTIONS”. KHYBER MEDICAL UNIVERSITY JOURNAL, Vol. 12, no. 2, June 2020, pp. 132-6, doi:10.35845/kmuj.2020.18913.
Section
Original Articles
Author Biographies

Ghazala Shaheen, Kabir Medical College, Peshawar, Pakistan

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Kabir Medical College, Peshawar.

Taqdees Mehmood, Rawal Institute of Health Sciences, Islamabad

Assistant Professor, OBGYN, Rawal Institute of Health Sciences, Islamabad

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