COMPARISON BETWEEN MCKENZIE EXTENSION AND NECK ISOMETRIC EXERCISES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NONSPECIFIC NECK PAIN: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Main Article Content

Naveed Arshad
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1143-8959
Aqeel Ahmad
Babar Ali
Muhammad Imran
Shoukat Hayat

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of neck exercises (McKenzie extension and isometric exercises) in the management of non-specific neck pain and range of motion in patients with neck pain.
METHODS: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in physiotherapy departments of Dr. Akbar Niazi Teaching Hospital, Islamabad. Forty consecutive patients with acute to sub-acute cases of neck pain (<3 month) were enrolled. Based on lottery method two groups (n=20 in each group) were differentiated, Group-I (control) received isometric neck exercises and Group-II (treatment) received McKenzie extension exercises for 4-weeks along with hot packs therapy. Neck pain was measured using numeric pain rating scale (NPRS). All patients were tested on baseline, at 2nd and 4th week.
RESULTS: Mean age of the sample was 33.85±4.80 and 33.50±5.20 years in group-I and group-II respectively. Male to female ratio was 4:1 in both groups. Mean body mass index was 24.54±1.50kg/m2. NPRS at baseline was 5.80±0.41 in group-I while 6.10±0.64 in group-II (p-value=0.001). NPRS decreased to 3.75±0.72 in group-I and 3.00±0.73 in group-II after 4-weeks (p-value=0.001). Neck flexion (degrees) at baseline was 31±2.05 in group-I and 35.75±1.83 in group-II (p-value=0.001) while after 4weeks increased to 35.50±4.26 in group-I and 40±4.29 in group-II (p-value=0.002). Neck extension (degrees) at baseline was 44±2.05 in group-I and 40.75±1.83 in group-II (p-value=0.001) while after 4-weeks increased to 48.5±4.01 in group-I and 45±4.29 in group-II (p-value=0.011).
CONCLUSION: McKenzie exercises are more significant and show more improvement in reduction of pain and associated symptoms of neck and increased movements quicker than isometric exercises.

Article Details

How to Cite
Arshad, N., A. Ahmad, B. Ali, M. Imran, and S. Hayat. “COMPARISON BETWEEN MCKENZIE EXTENSION AND NECK ISOMETRIC EXERCISES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NONSPECIFIC NECK PAIN: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL”. KHYBER MEDICAL UNIVERSITY JOURNAL, Vol. 12, no. 1, Mar. 2020, pp. 6-9, doi:10.35845/kmuj.2020.18656.
Section
Original Articles

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