EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SPINAL CORD INJURIES DUE TO BOMB BLAST ATTACKS, MANAGED AT PARAPLEGIC CENTRE PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN: A NINE YEARS RETROSPECTIVE STUDY
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Arsh, A., Darain, H., Haq, Z., Zeb, A., Ali, I., & Ilyas, S. (2017). EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SPINAL CORD INJURIES DUE TO BOMB BLAST ATTACKS, MANAGED AT PARAPLEGIC CENTRE PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN: A NINE YEARS RETROSPECTIVE STUDY. KHYBER MEDICAL UNIVERSITY JOURNAL, 9(2). Retrieved from https://www.kmuj.kmu.edu.pk/article/view/16814

Abstract

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: to present demographic details, nature of injury, clinical characteristics of patients admitted to Paraplegic Centre, Peshawar, Pakistan who sustained spinal cord injury (SCI) due to bomb blasts attacks (BBA).

METHODS: This retrospective quantitative study was conducted on 91 patients who sustained SCI due to BBA. These patients were admitted to Paraplegic Centre, Peshawar from 2007 to September 2016. Data about demographic information, neurological level, ASIA impairment scale, clinical characteristics, complications and other associated problems of patients were retrieved.

RESULTS: Out of 91 patients, 75 (82.4%) were males and 16 (17.6%) were females with mean age of 28.3±11.0 years. Majority of the patients were from district Swat (14.3%) followed by Peshawar (12.1%). In 72 (79.1%) cases, SCI was caused by penetrating fragments (splinters/shrapnel). Forty one (45.1%) patients had complete transaction at thoracic level. Fifty nine (64.8%) patients had wounds at multiple sites of body. Seventy seven (84.6%) patients had ASIA impairment scale ‘A’. Common associated injuries included fractures in upper limbs (9.9%) and lower limbs (6.6%). Twenty three (25.3%) patients had laparotomy for visceral injuries. Sixty seven (73.7%) patients had pressure sores.  Eighty eight (96.7%) patients completed rehabilitation program, 2 (2.2%) patients left hospital without completing rehabilitation program and one (1.1%) patient died during hospitalization.

CONCLUSION: The main cause of SCI due to BBA was penetration fragments. Male population is more exposed to these injuries compared to female. Moreover, SCI due to BBA was associated with injuries to other parts of body. Pressure sores were the most frequent secondary complication.


Key words

Spinal Cord Injury (MeSH), Spinal Injury (MeSH), Bomb Blast Attacks (Non-MeSH), Terrorism (MeSH), Suicide bombing (Non-MeSH), Mass Casualty Incidents (MeSH) 

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