POSITIVE ATTITUDE AND STRESS AMONG ADULTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASES IN FAISALABAD
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Positivity and Stress among Adults with Coronary Heart Diseases in Faisalabad
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Zaidi, S. M., Yaqoob, N., Naveed, A., Gulshan, N., & Hussain, S. (2018). POSITIVE ATTITUDE AND STRESS AMONG ADULTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASES IN FAISALABAD. KHYBER MEDICAL UNIVERSITY JOURNAL, 10(3), 146-49. Retrieved from https://www.kmuj.kmu.edu.pk/article/view/17713

Abstract

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Primary objective was to identify the relationship between stress and positive attitude among adults with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). Secondary objective was to predict Stress from Positive attitude in illness by controlling demographic characteristics (age, gender, and marital status) among adults with CHD.

METHODS: This was a Cross-sectional survey research conducted during March-May 2017 in Public Hospitals of Faisalabad, Pakistan. Study sample was selected through purposive sampling technique. The sample size consisted of 278 (155 men, 123 women) CHD inpatients and out patients with age range from 18-80 years. Perceived Stress scale Urdu 10 items (PSS-10) and Silver Lining Questionnaire (SLQ) Urdu version 38 were used to measure stress and positive attitude in illness respectively. SPSS 21 was used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS: A significant positive relationship exists between age and stress while a significant negative relationship exists between positivity and stress among adults with CHD. After controlling the demographic characteristics such as age, gender, and marital status, positive attitude in illness is significant predictor of stress among adults with CHD.

CONCLUSION: Adults with CHD have a high level of stress and low level of positive attitude. Stress and positive attitude are interlinked and statistically significant negative relationship among adults with CHD, further age; gender and marital status are significant predictors of stress among CHD adult patients.

KEY-WORDS: Stress (Non-MeSH); Coronary Disease (MeSH); Adult (MeSH); Positive attitude (Non-MeSH)

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References

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