NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND DIETARY INTAKE OF BOARDER FEMALE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE, PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN
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Shakoor, H., Khan, S., Samiullah, M., Zeb, F., Iqbal, U., & Khattak, F. (2017). NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND DIETARY INTAKE OF BOARDER FEMALE STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF AGRICULTURE, PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN. KHYBER MEDICAL UNIVERSITY JOURNAL, 9(2). Retrieved from https://www.kmuj.kmu.edu.pk/article/view/15698

Abstract

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the nutritional status and dietary intake of boarder female students of the University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted from March to June, 2014. A convenient sample of 141 boarder female students of age 18-19 years were selected from hostels of University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan. Written informed-consent was taken from the study subjects. Pre-planned questionnaires were used to collect data about anthropometric, biochemical and dietary intake. Data was analyzed through SPSS windows-version 16.0. ANOVA–I was used to compare means of normal, underweight and overweight BMI group at 5% level of significance.

RESULTS: Mean weight, height & BMI were 52.89±9.0 kg, 156.9±12.7 cm & 21±3.48 respectively. Nutritional status assessment of boarder female students showed that 34 (24.1%) female students were underweight, 18 (12.8%) of the respondents were overweight/obese and 98 (63.1%) were normal weight. Seventy three percent (n=103) were anemic and 27% (n=38) were non-anemic. In anemic students, 18.44% were underweight and 5.67% were underweight in non-anemic. Energy intake of university adolescent girls was 61.1% carbohydrates 40%, fats 59-104%, protein 91.30%, iron 94.4%, zinc 87%, calcium 33% and vitamin-A 46.6% of the recommended dietary allowances (RDA).

CONCLUSION: Majority of boarder female students were having normal weight. All the macronutrients and micronutrients intake of the adolescent girls were lower than recommended RDA levels except fat. Majority of the hostel adolescent girls consumed cereal (69.9%) daily while fruits, vegetables, pulses, legumes, milk and milk product, meat and meat products intake were very low.   

KEY WORDS: 

Nutritional Status (MeSH), Boarder female students (Non-MeSH), Students (MeSH), Micronutrients (MeSH), Macronutrients (Non-MeSH), Food (MeSH)

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